How to organize a perfect safari to Serengeti National Park

safari-serengetiThis amazing destination is encompassed with game rich sanctuaries that make for an unparallel safari experience. In other words don’t rush your safari, take it step by step or you will miss out on out.

Serengeti National park is the kingdom of predators, while the colossal groups of the Migration thunder over the plain in various numbers. The park has a lot to offer that the worlds last continuing to be great migration. Be that as it may, this migration is so magnificent it is scarcely unexpected most guests to the Serengeti National Park try to time there itinerary to go with the migration.

It is a great idea to try to get all over the place when on Safari. While it ought to be said that it is not continually practical nor is a good idea to leave your vehicle on some events it motivated. Kayaking on Lake Manyara or nature walk around the Tarangire Wilderness Area are great ways to stretch the legs and see, odor and feel the African wilderness far from the boundaries of the 4×4.

This is the one time it is allowed to drive in the Serengeti National Park in the pre-down. At times, ascend to 1000 meters or more to see the enormity and breathtaking panorama of the Serengeti. From time to time the pilot ought to put more heat into the balloon with the intense whisper burners.

A critical thought for the majority of people is the expense. The Serengeti is not generally reasonable – with park charges alone multiplying in 2014 to US $60 per individual daily. There are some lodges that take care for budget safaris and in case you also travel in low season then lodge costs are lowered considerably.

How long should a safari to Serengeti be? The Serengeti alone is so big months could be spent exploring the park. A main guideline would be to spend 5 days in the main and southern Serengeti or the main and northern Serengeti depending on the season of year is the minimum time to acquire any genuine feel or pleasure for the area.

When the best time to visit Serengeti? The dry season is July to December and is the ideal time for a photographic tour. The short rains are in November and the long rains from March to mid June. Be that as it may, the weather does not always act naturally. A few years we have had more rain in January and February than the whole of the rainy season. It may be perfect to start the downpours are from November to June with a drier period from December to mid March. Keep in mind that low season is both much cheaper and receives fewer visitors.

What season to book a tour to this park depends on precisely what you need and to work carefully with your excursion operator will help you choose. I would aim to avoid late July to the end of September for the sole reason the parks and set number of lodges are just excessively hectic.

If you are an experienced voyager, there is no reason why you should not touch arrive in Arusha and organize your safari with a local travel company. I have worked as a tour operator in Arusha in northern Tanzania and planned itineraries for tourists who have really had up to three travel agents in a chain all including commission onto the rate of the safari.

A tour for one or two people is expensive. One method to reduce this expense is to join with a group. Joining a group tour will be less expensive; this being the only advantage if cost is an issue. To impart a safari vehicle to regularly requiring new people might case problem once the safari starts.

The more concerns you ask the more viable will be your safari. The quality of the answers you get to your worries will also show how interested your tour operator in Tanzania is on the success of your safari verses simply making a profit.

One final comment will be to unwind whilst on safari- remove you view as it simply won’t be required. There is not the very same reality on an Africa safari.

Uganda Rwanda Safari Tipping Guide

What is a tip?
It is a token given after service delivery. It is a sign of appreciating the service given – Tips are mainly given to waiters, waitresses, and driver – guides, fuel attendant, Lodges or Hotel attendants, consultants, park rangers, Park guides/destination guides, Teachers and  many more. Tipping is done willingly – not a must but in developed states like United States of America, Japan, Chaina and so on, tipping is a culture every after service.

tipping-guide-africa

In East Africa, the culture of tipping is just developing by the tourist on holidays for leisure, Wildlife viewing, Gorilla treks, chimp tracks, Mountain climbing among others. To many tourists from developed countries, find it a must to tip but the question are; how to tip? When to tip? Who should tip? And to whom?

How to tip?
As discussed above, tipping is done willingly by the client (s), he or she can decide to tip or not. However if you decide to tip, feel free to give any amount basing on your budget and satisfaction. Tipping creates confidence and friendship between the staff and the client. In East Africa, a client can tip in Uganda shillings, Kenya Shillings, Tanzania Shillings, Rwanda Francs or in major International currencies like US dollars, Euro and Australian Dollars.

When to tip?
According to Mathias Mukasa from Rwanda safari company known as Gorilla Expeditions Limited, tipping is always done after service delivery – it is a sign of appreciating the services rendered to the client (s). The amount of the tip depends on the clients’ satisfaction delivered from the utilization of commodity. Mathias gave an example of tourists on their safaris in Rwanda who tip guides at the end of the trip (At the airport or hotel), and park rangers tipped at the end of gorilla trekking, same as hoteliers given tips on check-out, or after order delivery.

Who should tip?
The clients/ visitors are the ones supposed to tip but it is done willingly – not forced.

Why tip?
Visitors/ clients tip to show their appreciation for the service delivered to them.
They also tip to create or strengthen friendship between the service deliverer and the service.

Whom should be tipped?
The service deliverer is the one supposed to be tipped, they include waiters, waitresses, drivers, guides, consultant among others. On other words, each person should be tipped in his / her place of work depending on the kind of service delivered. For instance, if you went out for a game drive in Akagera National Park with a ranger guide, he deserves a tip depending on the service delivered, that is, if you are satisfied. If you went on gorilla trekking in Volcanoes National Park in accompany of a armed rangers, park guides and porters, those people deserve a tip, however small it may be. Above all, your driver / Guide also deserves a tip as he contributes a lot to your holiday.

Gorilla Trekking Code of Conduct

About Gorilla Trekking

Mountain gorilla trekking is ranked amongst the world’s top adventurous activities, only done in East and Central Africa. This is the only place in the world where one can travel to and see the mountain gorillas in their natural habitat. Gorilla Census report of 2011 showed that, there are only 880 mountain gorillas left in the whole world, found in the Virunga volcanic mountain ranges shared among Uganda, Rwanda and DR Congo. Out of 880, Uganda has about 440, which is almost half of it. This means that, like cross river gorillas (250 – 300 remaining), mountain gorillas are also critically endangered. And the number of visitors par day is limited to 8 people visiting each gorilla group. The limit aims at protecting these gentle giants through conserving their environment. You need a gorilla permit that acts as permission to participate in a guided forest to search for gorillas. A gorilla trekking permit in Rwanda costs US dollars 750 each, US dollars 600 in Uganda and US dollars 500 in DR Congo. Gorilla trekking in Rwanda takes place in Volcanoes National Park with currently over 10 gorilla groups, and in Uganda, gorilla tracking takes place in Bwindi Impenetrable National Park with currently 12 gorilla groups and 1 gorilla group in Mgahnga National Park. Gorilla Trekking in DR Congo’s Virunga National Park is not well developed due to some political unrests in the region but its one of the perfect destinations to see gorillas in the wild with big gorilla groups and silverbacks and babies.

How to behave on the way to trek Gorillas:

Always follow the instructions from the ranger guides while on the way to search for mountain Gorillas. Rangers may instruct you to follow a certain route, keeping quiet, keep close and so on, and please obey.

If you have any transmitted or contiguous disease like cold, dysentery, skin disease, cough and so on. Please remain behind and wait for you’re refunded according to the Uganda Wildlife Authority refund regulations or you can decide to reschedule the tracking date to meet gorillas after recovery.

Only 8 visitors or trackers are allowed to visit each gorilla group since a large group can stress the gorillas. In a Small group, the gorillas are comfortable and relaxed with there visitors’ presence.

It is advisable to wash your hands with detergent so that you do not carry any germs to the field which may spread diseases to the gorillas. They are highly susceptible to human diseases.

Avoid dumping any rubbish on the way because the gorillas can easily pick it and eat it. This also spoils the environment.

Since gorillas are mobile in their nature environment, you are expected to endure the difficulties in trying to meet them. The ranger guide will guide you following the trails to the area they were last seen the previous day. In case they moved, you are requested to be patient as you search since these are free animals in there natural habitat.

Set your cameras in advance – avoid flash cameras to avoid stressing the Gorillas. You need to be patient and wait to take out your cameras until advised to do so. He has to first observe there mood before you can take any action.

Don’t forget extra batteries and insect repellent while going on a gorilla trek in Africa.

Who will save the African Endangered species

African elephants roaming, TanzaniaA recent report published in the US Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences journal showed that around 100,000 elephants were killed in the last four years internationally.

The International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) estimated that the elephant population over the African continent had dropped from 550,000 in 2006 to 470,000 in 2013. It had been caused by mainly poaching and environmental degradation.

Luckily, statistics from Uganda Wildlife Authority (UWA) shows that elephant population for Queen Elizabeth Protected Area has continuously increased from 400 in 1988 to 2,959 in 2010, while in the same period in Murchison Falls Protected Area, the large mammals have too increased from 201 in 1995, to 904 in the same period.

In the same period, the number Buffaloes has increased from 2,477 to 9,192, that of giraffes from 153 to 930 and Hartebeests from 2,431 to 3,589 because of several factors, incorporating stability in the nation, strict conservation measures and general awareness among the population.

These wildlife crimes not only threaten the presence of different species and the tourism industry, additionally national security as gangs and other terrorist organizations use this as an avenue to get funding to facilitate their activities.
And indeed expected illicit wildlife products worth more than Shs5 billion was seized a year ago, according to the Tourism, Wildlife and Antiquities minister, Ms Maria Mutagamba.

Speaking at the Illegal Wildlife Trade Conference in Botswana’s northeastern town of Kasane, Ms Mutagamba said illicit killing of elephants and its trade has derailed the continent’s tourism industry, which of later, is ending up being a backbone of foreign exchange earnings for most African countries.

Uganda’s tourism industry contributed 7.9% of the nation’s Gross Domestic Product in 2013 translating into Sh5.5 trillion and created over 500,000 employments. In spite of this contribution, the industry got just near to Sh800 million as its investment in the same Financial Year.

“In only one year, we have seized more than two tons of Ivory [estimated to be worth about Shs2.2 billion], 30 Rhino horns and around two tons of Pangolin scales [worth over Shs2.9 billion] at Entebbe International Airport. We are resolved to make it increasingly hard for wildlife traffickers to use Uganda as a transit nation,” Ms Mutagamba said.

Uganda is not just a transit area for the valuable wildlife products however it has excessively encountered the same crimes.

Uganda Wildlife Authority (UWA) executive director Andrew Seguya, who was part of Minister Mutagamba’s contingent, said Uganda has been successful in capturing consignments of wildlife contraband because of surveillance.

“We have created intelligence service of over 80 officers and a plenty of informers” across border points and around game reserves and national parks

However, there is more that needs to be done to stamp out the vice, he said. As indicated by Ms Mutagamba, Uganda has encountered several difficulties in the management of the national ivory stockpile to the extent that around 1.2 tons of ivory was lost in 2014.

A year ago, a review by UWA found that 1,300 kilograms of ivory worth $1.1m (about Shs3b) was missing, hence attracting the attention of President Museveni, who asked the Inspector General of Government to investigate the matter. The IGG’s report is yet to be released.

Early this month, China, the world’s biggest ivory importer, forced a one-year ban on ivory carving imports. Ivory is a highly prized item in markets, for example, Malaysia and China as it is an indication of prestige and riches. From ivory, magnificent sculptures are made. With the increase in incomes by the Chinese, the demand for ivory has increased in the previous years, leading to the killing of many African elephants.

Ms. Mutagambwa said Uganda will keep on using the accredited forensic laboratories in USA and South Africa to focus in ascertaining the origin of seized ivory and rhino horns. She however said “Uganda welcomes the foundation of the new forensic laboratory in Nairobi and we will certainly make use of it,”

At the same meeting, Minister Mutagambwa accepted to join the Elephant Protection Initiative (EPI), however asked subsidizing that will empower the impllementation of the African Elephant Action Plan. Botswana President, Lt Gen Khama Ian Khama, said wildlife poaching and trafficking had indeed reached unmatched levels all through the world, particularly with endangered species.

Herbivores animals in Uganda

Herbivores are animals which feed only on plant materials. They have typically flat teeth and mouthparts that are modified to grinding grasses, tree bark and other tough materials. Uganda contains different types of herbivores animals which attracts safaris to Uganda.

In these national parks, herbivores are the commonest seen by tourists on Uganda safari parks and this includes

Elephants. They are the largest on land mammal in the world. Safaris to Uganda’s National parks offer clients the chance to see this mammal. Uganda safari parks are homes to the African elephant specie and the African bush elephants which can be sighted in Murchison falls National Park, Queen Elizabeth National park and Kidepo valley National park. African forest elephants are found in Kibale national park, Rwenzori mountains national Park and Bwindi national Park.

Giraffes are the tallest mammal on land consisting of attractive long neck and colorful skin. Safaris in Uganda offer an opportunity to see the giraffe family. Uganda has the exclusive giraffe species known as Rothschild giraffes only found in Murchison Falls National Park and Kidepo National Park

Antelope family in Uganda is the majority wildlife species comprising of 29 species with the eland the world’s largest species. Most Uganda’s national parks are homes to a number of these antelopes. Game drives in both Murchison falls and Kidepo National Park provides clients on Uganda Safari the greatest opportunity to see these animals which includes, African buffaloes, Oribi, Burchell’s zebras, waterbucks, Uganda Kobs, , hartebeest, Topi, Impalas, among others.

Uganda safari Experience with my Parents

If you’ve not yet traveled the world there is some thing you’re missing. This time my parents took me for a real safari as they promised me. All along they’ve been taking me to zoos but this time round I got that chance to see wildlife in their natural habitat. I went on a safari with my parents and I do believe that this is the best vacation I have ever taken in my life time. Sure, I have a whole lifetime of vacations ahead of me but I cannot even imagine something comparing to the experiences I had on this one. We got a plane which took us to Entebbe international airport where I was surprised by the hospitable people right from the time we landed on the Ugandan soil up to the park. We latter received by our tour guide who welcomed us and briefed us a bout the whole safari, he latter transferred us to our accommodation which we booked for the night; we enjoyed both local and international food.

The following day we started the real safari when the guide took us to the southwestern part of the country to Queen Elizabeth national park with a fantastic view throughout. The park is gifted by a wide biodiversity of animal species ranging from the big five to small mammals have never seen in my life grazing just meters from me like the herds elephants, giant forest hog, buffaloes, warthogs, bush buck, lion, leopard and chimpanzee up close in thick forest, indeed this was a grate moment seeing all these species in their national environment in a tourist vehicle was a breathtaking moment in life I will never forget. We also went to Kenya, Tanzania and Rwanda all I saw was just amazing.

The parks were so nice with a variety of wildlife. I never would have thought that I would get to see African wildlife so up close in a close distance. In fact it was thrilling and owe- inspiring to see the land and the animals that live there. I am a child and a teenager. Like other kids of my age I thought my summer would be wasted hanging around my parents in a foreign country. I figured I would make the best of the vacation, but my dad was right. This was simply spectacular! I had so much to tell my friends when I got back and there were no good words to truly describe the experiences I had in Africa. Certainly it will remain the best safari for ever I have to go back to Uganda safari vacation for more experience and this time I won’t miss out gorilla tracking.

 

African Primates Tracking Tips – Uganda and Rwanda

Among the most popular primates visited by tourists in Uganda and Rwanda are the Chimpanzees, black and white colobus monkeys as well as golden monkeys. Our focus today is on Golden monkey tracking in Uganda and Rwanda. The swift golden monkeys are always busy with pulling faces, grooming each other and flying between tree branches. Today, golden moneys are only found in Virunga National Park in Democratic Republic of Congo, Gishwati Forest, volcanoes National Park and Nyungwe forest in Rwanda as well as Mgahinga Gorilla National Park in Uganda.

It is amazing that Gorillas and golden monkeys freely move between the three countries without visas. The trek gives one an opportunity to see the apes in action, petting and having a siesta. Sandra E. Gray contend that, their groups are single male multi-family, meaning there are only one resident male and several adult females, plus young ones of varying ages.

However, for reinforcement, between three and 11 outside males are accepted to join the group temporarily during the breeding season. Communication in monkeys is by sign language, vocal sounds and facial expressions. Grey says these have not yet been comprehensively studied and only the most obvious gestures are understood to any degree. Monkeys eat 33 record plant species, including fruits and flowers.

Their menu further consists of small invertebrates and bamboo leaves that make up the bulk of their diet. Golden monkeys’ habitat is in the evergreen semi-deciduous and bamboo forests. Uganda Wildlife Authority directorate of conservation has now finished golden monkey habituation process for experiential tourism.

This strategy aims at diversifying tourism activities. Tracking experience takes place in the mornings and some times in some places in the afternoons within a 23– 50 hectare area to maximize the experience. “The fee is US dollars 50, inclusive of the park entry fees. The maximum number per visiting group per day will be six,” Ingrid Nyonza Nyakabwa, the Uganda Wildlife Authority marketing manager, says. “You will not have any regrets.

Golden monkey tracking in Rwanda takes place in Volcanoes National park, famously known for mountain gorilla tours. A 3 days tour package is recommended to see Rwanda gorillas and golden monkeys in Volcanoes national park.

My Gorilla Trekking Experince in Bwindi Impenetrable Forest – Uganda

Waking up early in the morning to go to the park headquarters in Bwindi National Park for gorilla trekking was one of the dreams that I had for many years. I had been saving money for this safari lastly the chance crossed my direction. I was one of the lucky visitors who got a gorilla trekking permit to Rushegura gorilla group one of three gorilla groups in Buhoma region of Bwindi Forest National Park.

Several times, I had been attempting to secure a gorilla permit for myself however since gorilla trekking tours are on high demand, the dates of my excursion were always fully booked or the accommodation was not available for me to stay at. I never lost hope until the time when I at last secured gorilla permit through Gorilla Expeditions Ltd and 2 bed nights at Buhoma Community Rest Camp which was preferred accommodation.

On the day of the arrival at the Airport, I was picked by the tour guide from Gorilla Expeditions Ltd who transferred me to Buhoma Community Rest Camp where I was warmly welcomed by the lodge manager who offered a drink, brief talk about the lodge and its services. I was really impressed. I don’t know whether it was anxiety or excitement that kept me conscious all night long but as I recollect, my dreams were filled with meeting with the mountain gorillas the following day.

Very early in the morning, we woke up for a heavy breakfast which was served at the common lounge area. The waiter gave each of us the trekkers our packed lunch boxes for the day because the time of our return was unpredictable and depends on the movement of mountain gorillas in search for food. We strolled to the park headquarters for a short briefing from the park ranger and later in the company of our ranger 8 of us walked into the think jungle to search for the mountain gorillas. Mr. Mutebire our ranger guide clarified that, mountain gorillas search for food throughout the day so we need to follow their path. He included that despite the fact that gorillas are huge in size, they eat foliage only and bamboo is there delicacy.

Birds in the forest kept us entertained due to the fact that the park hosts over 350 species of birds the guide told us and monkey hopped from one branch to another. As we walked, our guide stopped us and reminded us to lower our voices because we were getting closer to the gorillas. They are very sensitive to intruders explained Mutebire. At this time, I felt a quick ice running through my body to the feet but I was still eager to see the gorillas. We had them grumbling and finally got into and open space where they had been feed the entire day. I have traveled to Africa for several safaris but to be honest, this was an excellent encounter that I wished to share with all readers.

Birds kept us entertained and monkey jumped from one tree another. As we walked, our ranger guide stopped us and reminded us to bring down our voices because we were getting closer to the mountain gorillas. They are very sensitive to intruders clarified Mutebire. At this time, I felt a quick ice going through my body to the feet but I was still anxious to see the gorillas. We had them grumbling lastly got into and open space where they had been feed the whole day. I have traveled to Africa for a number of tours but to be frankly, this was a memorable experience that I wished to share to all readers.

The gorilla group we tracked was well organized with the females taking care of the babies, the young playing form the vines and as we kept gaping, the male silverback emerged from its hiding. He was tall, huge, and dark and looked defensive. He continued watching his family and pouncing at the young ones. We took various photographs and after an hour, we needed to leave there presence but all of us were still in need of watching them. For sure I will push and save for another gorilla trekking safari in Uganda.

Primate Safaris with Gorilla Expeditions in Rwanda

I took a trip with Gorilla Expeditions Ltd to see the mountain gorillas in 2013 and decided to organize my trip with Steve, the travel consultant of Gorilla Expeditions, specialists in gorilla tours and wildlife safaris in Rwanda and Uganda. After spending 14 days in Tanzania on the northern safari circuit it was so refreshing to see the green Rwanda country side. Tom was our driver/guide and he was superb! We kept him fairly busy driving us around and really wanted to get to see as much of the country as we could in the few short days we were there.

silverback-gorillaTom seemed to relish the idea of showing us as much of his country as we could fit in to 8 days Rwanda Gorilla and Cultural expedition. We came by RwandAir a day before to our amazing Rwanda trip one day earlier; Gorilla expedition understood and took care of the change very quickly agent booking of double room at Kigali Serena Hotel at a very affordable price and it was all fun staying at this luxury hotel in the whole world!

Our house keeper was so hospitable and flexible to our needs, for so many times I have traveled to Africa Serena Hotels whole over Africa that is in Rwanda, Uganda, Kenya and Tanzania, this hotel has the international first class hospitality facilities straight away from external out look of the amenities and when you enter into the rooms there really worse the money you pay, when you come to the décor and the services bit the continental and African cuisines Serena hotels are the home to be on your travel to Africa.

As we were still in our nice room, Steve the travel consultant of Gorilla Expedition Limited arrived at the lodge to orient us and when he started describing Rwanda and what really the country offers for instance the mountain gorillas and the culture of Rwanda, I started getting the exact pictures of what our, I and my wife safari will be.

At this very night gave us each an itinerary that was describing all places that we were entitled to visit and as our first experience was to meet the mountain gorillas in the mist, Volcanoes National Park I and my wife we spent the whole night imagining what the experience will be and we slept prepared with all what Steve advised us to come with in order to enjoy this gorilla trekking expedition in Africa.

Early in the morning we were met at the hotel by the guide/driver and we started hitting the road transferring to Ruhengeri where we had our second overnight before the next day we enjoyed the gorilla trekking experience and on this evening we visited the amazing Rwanda twin Lakes (Burera and Ruhondo). The driver-guide was a great source of information on history, current events, animals, where to go and pretty much more questions we had as we were eager to learn more about Rwanda and the Africa in general.

Dispersed Gorilla Groups Challenge Field Staff

April was a very busy month for the Dian Fossey Gorilla Fund field staff. In addition to being the rainy season in Rwanda, which has not made the job of tracking any easier, we have both lost track of and found some important gorilla groups.

The newly formed Gushimira group had not been seen since March 24, and is not available for gorilla trekking, despite exhaustive efforts to locate them, and female Umusatsi, who had not been seen since she left Kuryama’s group March 17, was not located again until April 15 (still traveling alone). The anti-poaching team, as well as trackers from the Rwanda Development Board, have joined the groups’ regular trackers in the search efforts on several occasions.

UPDATE: Umusatsi finally joined Giraneza’s group on April 22. See our blog post for April 24, and expect more news about this adventurous female

While collaboration to find the dispersed gorillas is extremely important and useful, it is not without its drawbacks. According to Felix Ndagijimana, director of the Karisoke Research Center, when our anti-poaching teams have to support trackers in searches for missing gorilla groups, they cannot do their regular jobs of routine and shock patrols, which are also extremely important. “We do see a direct correlation in the field between the times when anti-poaching teams are not doing their patrols and spikes in the number of snares found later.”

Though the Gushimira group has caused us to use a lot of manpower in searching for them, Ndagijimana says that currently there is no other cause for concern for the groups’ wellbeing. “Before the Gushimira group formed, the individual silverback Gushimira had disappeared for quite a long time. We expect he has taken the females to another area he is familiar with and where he is more comfortable ranging. Of course, we will continue to look for them to confirm this.”

With our workforce already spread so thin due to the missing Gushimira group, it has been difficult to allocate trackers for Giraneza’s group, which recently returned to Rwanda and will soon be available for visitors on Rwanda gorilla safaris and tours. We stopped monitoring that group in Sept. 2012 when they crossed the border into the Democratic Republic of Congo. Our first encounter with them since their disappearance was on Jan. 29. We were happy to see Giraneza and the two females, Taraja and Nyandwi, all together, although Nyandwi seemed to have an injury on her left arm. Since that first sighting in January, we encountered them seven more times in February and March, during which time we were able to confirm that Nyandwi’s injury had healed. In a meeting with the group on March 22 when we found Giraneza interacting with Bwenge’s group, we happily discovered that Taraja had given birth. The infant was estimated to be a week old at the time and in very good health, which continues to be the case.

With the return of Giraneza’s group, we have reorganized our tracker teams yet again. The Gushimira team is now being used to monitor Giraneza’s group, except when they are searching for the Gushimira group, which is currently limited to two days a week.

Ndagijimana cited a recommendation of the International Union for the Conservation of Nature’s Best Practice Guidelines for Great Ape Tourism as one of the reasons why it was essential for us to resume monitoring the group: “Of course, our wish is to be able to monitor all the habituated groups, for scientific research purposes, but it is particularly important to carry out regular monitoring and protection of groups that have been habituated to humans, as their habituation leaves them more vulnerable to threats like poachers.” The need to monitor the group is even more important with the discovery of the new infant, as infants have low survival rates. Partial monitoring of the group resumed in March, with full-time monitoring having resumed in mid April.

Giraneza
Reconnecting with the Giraneza group has been very exciting, and we are looking forward to finding Gushimira’s group, as the monitoring of both groups has particular significance for the Fossey Fund. As Gorilla Program Manager Veronica Vecellio puts it, “In 45 years of gorilla monitoring we have had very few occurrences of a solitary male forming his own group. Gushimira’s and Giraneza’s groups are examples of this, so they give us an excellent opportunity to investigate and compare the development of newly established groups.”

These events in the field this past month — losing track of Gushimira’s group and finding Giraneza’s group — have caused us to consider the possibility of hiring more trackers and the potential need to adjust our methods of tracking when there are major changes such as group splits, missing groups and the return of old groups. In times of major shifts in the gorilla groups we monitor, we need to be able to accommodate all of the groups for both scientific purposes and as a responsibility deriving from our habituation of them. There is no easy answer, but we are working to find the best solution, for our organization, for our trackers and for our gorillas. Read more about Rwanda travel tips on the internet, more information is available.